Tag Archive for: E400

Event 38 Announces New EO/IR Payload for E400 VTOL Drone

Event 38 Unmanned Systems, a leading manufacturer of American-made mapping drones, announces that the E400, Event 38’s latest fixed-wing mapping drone, is now available with a gimballed EO/IR camera from NextVision.

NextVision makes field-proven, stabilized cameras and accessories for a variety of commercial and industrial applications. Their gimballed EO/IR cameras capture high-quality visual and thermal imagery and video that can be streamed directly to a ground station.

Combining an EO/IR camera with the E400 platform creates a powerful tool for search-and-rescue, emergency management, and disaster response scenarios, including swift water rescue. The E400 is a military-grade drone with a carbon fiber frame, rather than foam, and is durable enough for rugged field applications. Additionally, the E400 has very long endurance and doesn’t require frequent intermissions for charging. As a result, the E400 can cover much more acreage in a single flight than a multirotor drone, which is vital when time is of the essence.

This new integration is also ideal for surveillance and security applications. The E400 is fully electric and very quiet, so it can fly much lower than other drones without detection.

“At Event 38, we’re always looking for ways to make drone technology accessible to industries and sectors that can really benefit from it, which is why we’re so thrilled to be integrating NextVision cameras with the E400,” said Jeff Taylor, founder & CEO of Event 38. “The E400 is extremely user-friendly; you don’t need a background in aeronautics to use it. This means that any public safety team—whether that’s the police, the sheriff, border control, search and rescue, emergency management, or disaster response—can add aerial surveillance to their capabilities without having to hire an additional operator.”

Event 38 recently demoed the E400 with an EO/IR camera at an Indiana Public Safety Drone Training event, with great success.

3D-Printed Antenna Demonstrated on E400 Drone

Earlier this year, Event 38 Unmanned Systems successfully flew a drone fitted with a 3D-printed antenna at Kent State University. The project, backed by the Ohio Federal Research Network (OFRN), was a collaboration between Event 38, Kent State University, Youngstown State University, and Youngstown Business Incubator (YBI), who led the project.

Event 38 consulted with YBI to explore the possibility of creating a 3D-printed antenna to replace the nose cone on the E400, an Event 38 mapping drone.

“3D printing is an exciting option for creating geometrically complex components, such as antennas,” said Jeff Taylor, CEO of Event 38. “Traditional manufacturing methods, such as machining, aren’t optimal for unusual shapes, which can require a lot of tooling and produce significant waste material. 3D printing is much more efficient for certain geometries.”

YBI experimented with different 3D-printed antenna designs to find one that matched the dimensional needs of the E400 and achieved the right frequency and distribution pattern.

The 3D-printed antenna created by YBI was fully integrated on the E400 and flown at an OFRN project demonstration at Kent State University.

“Geometrically complex 3D-printed antennas are very promising technology,” said Taylor. “In partnership with YBI, we proved the feasibility of a dual-purpose nose cone that served as both antenna and aerodynamic structure. But there’s potential to create structural parts, too. We could print a loadbearing piece that also serves as an antenna and thus replace a structural element, which reduces the overall weight of the aircraft.”

There are several applications in which full integration of the antenna into the existing shape of the aircraft is beneficial. In virtually any context, an integrated antenna is safer from bumps and damage than a whip antenna that protrudes from the plane. In the context of a hypersonic aircraft, a protruding antenna requires extra heat shielding, whereas an antenna that integrates with the shape of the fuselage could withstand both heat and hypersonic airflow without compromising performance.

Light weighting can also contribute meaningfully to overall performance of an unmanned aircraft. A lighter drone can fly longer and handle a heavier payload on the same amount of power.

Taylor is optimistic about the future of 3D-printed antenna and other sensors. “There may be long-term benefits we haven’t even realized yet. It could change the way we design and build drones in the future.”

To learn more about Event 38 or the E400, visit www.event38.com.