All New Scout Drone Now Available

The much anticipated Scout drone is now available from Event 38 and worldwide partners. The Scout is designed to be a small, lightweight and transportable drone that falls under the 2kg exception several countries have made for flying UAS with fewer restrictions. Its small size also makes it easy for beginner drone users to approach as it requires little configuration and no flying skills. The extremely durable airframe is also forgiving of landings on or in a wide variety of surfaces and vegetation.

Despite its small size and 1.37kg weight, the Scout is still a workhorse. Its 60 minute endurance allows it to fly over 240Ha (600 acres) per flight at 120m (400ft) AGL. Its high wing loading makes it less susceptible to turbulence than similarly sized light drones. It also makes it better able to pierce through strong headwinds with its 48kph (30mph) cruise speed. It can also make its landing approach at a 20% gradient without picking up excess speed in any wind conditions, for more convenient auto-landings near obstacles.

The Scout will begin shipping on November 1st starting with standard payloads of Sony WX500 and Canon S110s. Micasense RedEdge and Parrot Sequoia will be made available soon after. The starting price of the package including radios, a battery and charger is USD $2,190.

Sample Orthomosaic Created by Scout

QX1 Companion Computer Now Available

Event 38 is today announcing the release of a Companion Computer to the Sony QX1 camera. The companion computer is a fully integrated solution for streamlining the mapping and geotagging process on the E384, E386, and other Pixhawk-powered drones. It allows users to completely bypass the normal geotagging post-processing step. This relieves a burden on operators running frequent missions, and improves the geotag accuracy of those missions at the same time. That can lead to faster and more accurate orthomosaic stitching, too.

The Companion Computer connects directly to both the Sony QX1 camera and the Pixhawk autopilot. When you power on the aircraft, the camera automatically powers up and connects to the Companion Computer. In flight, the Companion Computer verifies directly with the camera that each picture was taken as expected. As each picture is taken, the Companion Computer transfers the image from the QX1 in real time to its own, easily accessible thumb drive. As each picture is saved, its geotags are added directly into its EXIF data as part of the same file and also written to a text log. The images with EXIF data can be imported directly into almost any post-processing software without further handling.

The Companion Computer currently requires a modified version of the QX1 available from Event 38 or by request to a user’s camera. The system is available now at www.Event38.com.

Mapping with the new Event 38 Companion Computer

The companion computer is a fully integrated solution for streamlining the mapping and geotagging process on the E384 and E386. It allows users to completely bypass the normal geotagging post-processing step. This relieves a burden on operators running frequent missions, and improves the geotag accuracy of those missions at the same time. That can lead to faster and more accurate orthomosaic stitching, too.

Here’s how it works. The Companion Computer connects directly to both your Sony QX1 camera and the Pixhawk autopilot. When you power on the aircraft, the camera automatically powers up and connects to the Companion Computer. When ready, it displays a green LED.

In flight, the Companion Computer verifies directly with the camera that each picture was taken as expected. As each picture is taken, the Companion Computer transfers the image from the QX1 in real time to its own, easily accessible thumb drive. As each picture is saved, its geotags are added directly into its EXIF data as part of the same file and also written to a text log. The images with EXIF data can be imported directly into almost any post-processing software without further handling, but the logs are always there for reference.

If the camera is taking images too quickly for each one to be transferred in real time, Companion Computer will attempt to catch up when the camera is less busy. For large, low altitude missions especially, images may still be processing after the aircraft lands. In this case, the solid red LED will let you know to wait until the process is complete before powering down the aircraft or removing the thumb drive.

When you leave the field, just pull out the thumb drive from the Companion Computer and bring it back to the office to upload or process your imagery. It’s as simple as that!

We’ll be releasing Companion Computer publicly in a few days, sign up for our newsletter to hear when it’s available. As always, feel free to contact us with questions or feedback.

PPK GPS Now Available

PPK GPS receivers are now available for integration with the E384/6 family of aircraft. See how the accuracy stacks up in our comprehensive case study.

Learn more about upgrading or adding PPK to a new aircraft.

Major Drone Data Management System™ Update

Major new features to the Drone Data Management System™ and new pricing are effective immediately for Pro and Advanced tier subscribers. To learn more, see our release notes on Droneyard or visit the DDMS™ page to sign up.

We Robotics uses E384 to Deliver Anti-Venom in Amazon

Non-profit organization We Robotics has achieved a world first by delivering anti-venom to a small village in the Peruvian Amazon. The area is densely forested and most transportation is on the water. As a result, transporting medical supplies from the nearest city can take up to 6 hours for a 35km trip. We Robotics has modified an E384, developed procedures and successfully navigated regulations in order to make the same delivery in just 35 minutes. For a region that reports 45 snakebites per year, their accomplishment may mean the difference between life and death.

Read more about the project here.